What to Put on Mosquito Bites

Infectious Diseases

What to Put on Mosquito Bites and Other Bug Bite Treatment

Mosquito bite treatment

  • What it looks like – red, itchy bumps
  • Treatment – wash with soap and water
    • Cold compresses or ice may reduce itching
    • What to put on mosquito bites – a great home remedy for mosquito bites is a water and baking soda mix applied to the bite. This may reduce swelling and itch
    • Allergic reaction to mosquito bites – diphenhydramine, over the counter can help minimize hives and discomfort. Then apply hydrocortisone to individual bites as needed.
  • What to look out for: if you or your child develops fever, body aches, a target-like rash, diarrhea or vomiting after having mosquito bites please see your doctor. Rarely mosquitos transmit Lyme Disease or West Nile Virus.

Bee or wasp sting

  • What it looks like – a red welt on the skin, painful and sometimes itchy. May have hives
  • Treatment – If the stinger is left behind gently push it away with a flat surface such as a credit card. Do not remove with tweezers as this may deposit more venom in the skin
    • Clean with soap and water
    • Apply ice for 10 -15 minutes intermittently to control pain and swelling
    • Ibuprofen may help relieve pain and swelling
  • What to look out for: anaphylaxis, a potentially deadly allergic reaction, can occur. Look for diffuse rash, swelling to the face, difficulty breathing or coughing, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain. If you experience even two of these symptoms, please call 911. Epinephrine may be required to prevent serious illness and death.

 What to put on mosquito bites – a great home remedy for mosquito bites is a water and baking soda mix applied to the bite.

Fly bite

  • What it looks like – red, itchy bump like mosquito bites
  • Treatment – wash with soap and water
  • Ice as above for bee stings
  • Hydrocortisone or an ammonia product can help minimize itching

Fire ant bites and stings

  • What it looks like – red, itchy bumps that turn into fluid filled blisters
  • Treatment – Clean with soap and water
  • Apply hydrocortisone to prevent itching
  • What to look out for – fire ant bites occasionally lead to anaphylaxis. See above from bee stings.

Spider bite

  • What it looks like – bump or sore at the site. Some people experience muscle cramps, nausea and chest pain
  • Treatment – ice the area a lot over the first 72 hours to prevent venom spread
    • Keep the body body part elevated above the level of the heart when able
    • Ibuprofen or acetaminophen can help minimize pain
  • What to look out for – if there are any severe symptoms such as fever or muscle aches, please see your doctor. This may be a sign of infection or severe reactions. Whenever possible try to capture the spider or take a photo to enable doctors to identify what kind of spider caused the bite. This can help in determining the best management

 

Tick bite

  • What it looks like – you may see a tick on the skin, or just a red bump that is itchy or burning
  • Treatment – if the tick is still attached use tweezers to very gently pull the head out of the skin. Careful not to squish the tick, which can lead to more of the tick’s blood getting into the wound
  • Put the tick in a closed container to show your doctor to identify risk if diseased
  • Clean with soap and water
  • What to look for – ticks can transmit Lyme Disease. Talk to our doctor if you experience flu like symptoms such as fever, headaches and chills

 

Kids outdoors playing? read this article on Cuts & Scrapes.

The general information provided on the Website is for informational purposes and is not medical advice.

Do NOT use this Website for medical emergencies.

If you have a medical emergency, call a physician or qualified healthcare provider, or CALL 911 immediately. Under no circumstances should you attempt self-treatment based on anything you have seen or read on this Website. Always seek the advice of your physician or other licensed and qualified health provider in your jurisdiction concerning any questions you may have regarding any information obtained from this Website and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or to someone else. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this Website.

Dina M. Kulik, MD, FRCPC, PEM

About Dina M. Kulik, MD, FRCPC, PEM

Dina is a wife, mother of 4, and adrenaline junky. She loves to share children’s health information from her professional and personal experience. More About Dr Dina.

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