About Dr. Dina

Dr. Dina Kulik is founder and director of Kidcrew and resides in Toronto, Canada.

I’m a wife, mother, pediatrician, and emergency medicine doctor.
I am constantly astounded with the poor caliber of children’s health information on the web, so I decided to share my own at DrDina.ca
I love providing practical and fun health knowledge to parents, teens, and kids too!

Hi, I’m Dr. Dina Kulik

I live in Toronto, Canada with my very supportive husband, four energetic and delicious sons (all under 7 years old) and two male dogs.

I am the founder and director of Kidcrew™ and work as an Emergency Medicine Physician at The Hospital for Sick Children.

I’m a spin fanatic and adrenaline junky, needing constant stimulation to keep from getting bored (maybe that’s where the kids get it from?). I thrive in organized chaos. Sound familiar parents?

Through this site, and my Kidcrew™ website, I’m hoping to get the conversation started on all things related to children’s health. From breastfeeding challenges, to solid food introduction to managing night terrors – I’ve been through it all both personally and professionally.

Raising healthy, adaptable children is a challenge. No one does perfectly and no one comes out unscathed. Survival is the goal most days!

Let’s chat and make it just a little bit easier with tips and tricks for parenting.

I look forward to connecting!

Hi, I’m Dr. Dina Kulik

I live in Toronto, Canada with my very supportive husband, four energetic and delicious sons (all under 7 years old) and two male dogs.

I am the founder and director of Kidcrew™ and work in as an Emergency Medicine Physician at The Hospital for Sick Children.

I’m a spin fanatic and adrenaline junky, needing constant stimulation to keep from getting bored (maybe that’s where the kids get it from?). I thrive in organized chaos. Sound familiar parents?

Through this site, and my Kidcrew™ website, I’m hoping to get the conversation started on all things related to children’s health. From breastfeeding challenges, to solid food introduction to managing night terrors – I’ve been through it all both personally and professionally.

Raising healthy, adaptable children is a challenge. No one does perfectly and no one comes out unscathed. Survival is the goal most days!

Let’s chat and make it just a little bit easier with tips and tricks for parenting.

I look forward to connecting!

Dr. Dina’s Published Research

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Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Infants Undergoing Meningitis Evaluation.

[Link To Research] Cruz AT, Freedman SB, Kulik DM, Okada PJ, Fleming AH, Mistry RD, Thomson JE, Schnadower D, Arms JL, Mahajan P, Garro AC, Pruitt CM, Balamuth F, Uspal NG, Aronson PL, Lyons TW, Thompson AD, Curtis SJ, Ishimine PT, Schmidt SM, Bradin SA, Grether-Jones KL, Miller AS, Louie J, Shah SS, Nigrovic LE; HSV Study Group of the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Collaborative Research Committee, Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Infants Undergoing Meningitis Evaluation. Pediatrics. 2018 Jan 3

Concomitant Bacterial Meningitis in Infants with Urinary Tract Infection.

[Link To Research] Thomson J, Cruz AT, Nigrovic LE, Freedman SB, Garro AC, Ishimine PT, Kulik DM, Uspal NG, Grether-Jones KL, Miller AS, Schnadower D, Shah SS, for the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Collaborative Research Committee (PEM CRC) HSV Study Group. Concomitant Bacterial Meningitis in Infants with Urinary Tract Infection. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 May 2

Correction of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein in Infants with Traumatic Lumbar Punctures.

[Link To Research] Lyons TW, Cruz AT, Freedman SB, Arms JL, Aronson PL, Fleming AH, Kulik DM, Mahajan P, Mistry RD, Pruitt CM, Thompson AD, Nigrovic L; Herpes Simplex Virus Study Group of the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Collaborative Research Committee (PEMCRC). Correction of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein in Infants with Traumatic Lumbar Punctures. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 May 3.

Should a hospitalized child receive empiric treatment with acyclovir?

[Link To Research]

Kulik DM, Mekky M, Yang M, Bitnum A, Parkin PC. Should this hospitalized child receive empiric treatment with acyclovir? Italian Journal of Pediatrics. 2012 Dec 17;38.

A systematic review of clinical prediction rules for children with suspected bacterial meningitis.

[Link To Research]

Kulik DM, Uleryk E, Maguire JL. Does this child have bacterial meningitis? A systematic review of clinical prediction rules for children with suspected bacterial meningitis. (Journal of Emergency Medicine). Accepted March 2013.

A systematic review of Clinical Prediction Rules for children with acute abdominal pain.

[Link To Research]

Kulik DM, Uleryk E, Maguire JL. Does this child have appendicitis? A systematic review of Clinical Prediction Rules for children with acute abdominal pain. J Clin Epidemiol. 2013 Jan;66(1):95-104

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Interpretation of Cerebrospinal Fluid White Blood Cell Counts in Young Infants With a Traumatic Lumbar Puncture.

[Link To Research]

Lyons TW, Cruz AT, Freedman SB, Neuman MI, Balamuth F, Mistry RD, Mahajan P, Aronson PL, Thomson JE, Pruitt CM, Shah SS, Nigrovic LE; Pediatric Emergency Medicine Clinical Research Network (PEM CRC) Herpes Simplex Virus Study Group. Interpretation of Cerebrospinal Fluid White Blood Cell Counts in Young Infants With a Traumatic Lumbar Puncture. Ann Emerg Med. 2016 Dec 2.

Diagnostic Properties of Serial Ultrasound Diagnostic Clinical Pathway in Suspected Appendicitis and Related CT Use.

[Link To Research]

Schuh S, Chan K, Langer J, Kulik DM, Preto-Zamperlini M, Al Aswad N, Man C, Mohanta A, Stephens D, Doria AS, Diagnostic Properties of Serial Ultrasound Diagnostic Clinical Pathway in Suspected Appendicitis and Related CT Use. Academic Emergency Medicine, 2015, April 22(4): 406-414.

Imported Pediatric Malaria at the Hospital for Sick Children Toronto Canada: A 16 Year Review.

[Link To Research]

Evans AB, Kulik DM, Morris SK, Banerji A, Boddlid A, Kain KC, Adelhaleem M. Imported Pediatric Malaria at the Hospital for Sick Children Toronto Canada: A 16 Year Review. BMC Pediatrics. 2014 Oct 4;14:251

An unexpected cause of emesis.

[Link To Research]

Kulik DM, Scolnik D. An unexpected cause of emesis. The Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 43, No. 4, pp. 702–703, 2012.

Clinical prediction rules for children - a systematic review.

[Link To Research]

Maguire JL, Kulik DM, Laupacis A, Kuppermann N, Uleryk EM, Parkin PC. Clinical prediction rules for children – a systematic review. Pediatrics. 128:3 e666-e677.

Homeless youth’s overwhelming health burden– a review of the literature.

[Link To Research]

Kulik DM, Gaetz S, Crowe C, Ford-Jones EL. Homeless youth’s overwhelming health burden– a review of the literature. Paediatrics and Child Health. Vol 16 No 6 June/July 2011 e43.

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