Don’t Want To Do Something Around Your House, Pawn It Off On Your Children And Make A Kids Chore Chart

Don’t Want To Do Something Around Your House, Pawn It Off On Your Children And Make A Kids Chore Chart

Don’t Want To Do Something Around Your House, Pawn It Off On Your Children And Make A Kids Chore Chart

 

Running house is a ton of work. There always seems to be something to do. From cleaning, cooking, laundry, picking up after the kids, doing dishes the list goes on and on. For many of us, the real weight is first felt when we leave our parents house and venture out on our own. As you begin building your family home, you and your partner each takes on their own roles and the division of labour should be equal. This is what we strive for in our house, and for us it works really well. When kids arrive, there is a whole host of other duties and seemingly, a ton more to do.

 

Teaching them to be responsible and thoughtful as young children will boost their self-confidence and make these characteristics stronger as they grow up.

 

But there is a light at the end of the tunnel and it comes in the form of chores. Having your kids do chores is a great way to lighten your load and give them some much-needed responsibility. Teaching them to be responsible and thoughtful as young children will boost their self-confidence and make these characteristics stronger as they grow up. Some kids appreciate a kids chore chart, believe it or not. Our kids have found their way into chores without needing one. But it’s in our back pocket if we need it.

 

Because they expressed an interest in helping out, I’m simply fostering their curiosity and willingness to contribute to the family meal.

 

We started teaching Dyl some basic responsibilities when Ry was just born. It was simple things like helping get diapers, or washing his toes when they were in the bath. We do the same with Ry now. As the kids have gotten older they are more eager to help out. Both the boys love to help cook and I enjoy it as well as I have some company in the kitchen. Because they expressed an interest in helping out, I’m simply fostering their curiosity and willingness to contribute to the family meal.

 

At 4 and almost 3 the bigger boys help set the table. One of them puts out the place mats while the other places the cutlery and napkins on top. The next day, they switch (as Dyl says, ‘it’s a pattern: Dylan, Ryan, Dylan, Ryan’).

 

At 4 and almost 3 the bigger boys help set the table. One of them puts out the place mats while the other places the cutlery and napkins on top. The next day, they switch (as Dyl says, ‘it’s a pattern: Dylan, Ryan, Dylan, Ryan’). Because Dyl is older, he has the added responsibility of cleaning up after himself and his brother. He brings the dirty dishes into the kitchen and puts them next to the sink. The funny thing is Ry really wants to help, but he is such a klutz he would end up tripping over his feet. So instead, he gets to carry his cup and maybe an empty bowl. This is not because we asked, but because he wanted to help.

 

Try showing a bit of enthusiasm. Yes, cleaning up the after the kids is a pain in the butt, but why not put on a fun song and make a game out of it. If it’s fun, it’s not work.

 

What I find interesting about this process is how much it extends into other areas. Dyl has started to do things like make his own bed, and often takes the initiative to clean up the kids’ toys. Ry likes to supervise and tell Dyl all the things he has missed. Perhaps it’s the gratitude that we express or their satisfaction with a job ‘well’ done. One tip that I can’t stress enough is that the job will not be perfect. They are after all kids, so help them out, show them the correct way of doing something. Try showing a bit of enthusiasm. Yes, cleaning up the after the kids is a pain in the butt, but why not put on a fun song and make a game out of it. If it’s fun, it’s not work.

 

The more responsibilities they have the more likely they are not to argue or put up a fight when you ask them to do something.

 

Kids can start having responsibilities early so if they express an interest in what you are doing let them help. After some time you can start stepping back and let them do the task on their own. Sure it might take a little longer, but you are simply teaching them that doing these things is a part of helping out around the house. The more responsibilities they have the more likely they are not to argue or put up a fight when you ask them to do something.

 

 

Dina-TakeAways-1(386)

Quick tips

  • Start small

  • Don’t expect perfection

  • Build a routine

  • Add responsibility as they age

  • Keep it fun

 

Want to read more on our child development theories?

How can you best foster social development in children?

 

 

Andrew Levy PhD

About Andrew Levy PhD

Andrew obtained his PhD from the University of Waterloo in Physiology, a topic not entirely having to do with with kids health specifically. Andrew’s expertise in kids health and raising children stems from his now 4+ years of direct hands on experiences with 3 little boys. My goal is to share some practical advice and some of the little not-so-perfect things my kids have done and how we managed to figure it all out so you can too.

View All Posts

Author Box Contact Form

Form used on Contact Tab in the Author-Box.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *